Luxuriate in the treachery of words with my Hunting of the Snark blog … or buy the GN from Melville House here and save me the bother of miscommunicating to you ever again.

Luxuriate in the treachery of words with my Hunting of the Snark blog … or buy the GN from Melville House here and save me the bother of miscommunicating to you ever again.

What do Vincent van Gogh, Augustus Caesar, V.I. Lenin, William Shakespeare and Lewis Carroll have in common? They’re all making a guest appearance in this week’s posting on my Hunting of the Snark blog. 
Or just buy the GN … Melville House and myself are itching to join the winner’s circle of running-dog-capitalists.

What do Vincent van Gogh, Augustus Caesar, V.I. Lenin, William Shakespeare and Lewis Carroll have in common? They’re all making a guest appearance in this week’s posting on my Hunting of the Snark blog.

Or just buy the GN … Melville House and myself are itching to join the winner’s circle of running-dog-capitalists.

writersnoonereads:

I contacted illustrator Mahendra Singh after learning that his late aunt Monica Tornow appears in Malcolm Green’s legendary anthology Black Letters Unleashed: 300 Years of Enthused Writing in German (Atlas, 1989). This post grew from our exchanges.
Tornow wrote short prose pieces and one novella, Ming-Fatso & Ming-Scrawn (1989, with illustrations by Wulf Lücks). She was born in 1938 in Dresden and died in 1996 in Virginia—on the family farm, which she visited every summer—surrounded by her beloved cats.
"Body Demons," the page-long work included in Black Letters Unleashed, is her only writing translated into English. It’s an extract from a collection of similar surrealist feuilletons published in 1978 in Manuskripte, an influential Austrian publication of the time. Mahendra says “the general tenor of the pieces reminds me of the Walser short ‘A Slap in the Face’… I’m looking over them and laughing, they’re pretty good. Burning chickens, leopards knocking at the door, time machines interacting with cats … they are right up your line.” You can now read “Body Demons” on 50 Watts, along with Mahendra’s own translation of another short work, “It Was a Beautiful Day.”

Mahendra writes:

Monica lived mostly in West Berlin, worked as a producer of documentaries for West German TV, and was a totally insane cat nut—Ming-Fatso & Ming-Scrawn is about her two Abyssinians. She wrote on the side, some good stuff but she was possessed of the true Bartleby spirit and simply couldn’t be bothered with the demon Ambition. She introduced me to Ernst, Walser, Gombrowicz, Saltykov, Lem and much more, the classic Central European tradition of mordant, black humour.  
Monica loved a crisp, cool Fontana Candida on a sweltering Virginia summer afternoon, followed by a good goulash and some Johann Stamitz on the stereo.
She was also involved sometimes with the Berlin Film Festival … she told me that when Kaurismäki attended one time, he had a guy who would walk before him with a bottle of schnapps on a silver tray, always ready to provide him a restorative shot.
She is sorely missed by her family (except for the damn cat hair that got into everything).


Also see: Two texts by Monica Tornow on 50 Watts.
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

writersnoonereads:

I contacted illustrator Mahendra Singh after learning that his late aunt Monica Tornow appears in Malcolm Green’s legendary anthology Black Letters Unleashed: 300 Years of Enthused Writing in German (Atlas, 1989). This post grew from our exchanges.

Tornow wrote short prose pieces and one novella, Ming-Fatso & Ming-Scrawn (1989, with illustrations by Wulf Lücks). She was born in 1938 in Dresden and died in 1996 in Virginia—on the family farm, which she visited every summer—surrounded by her beloved cats.

"Body Demons," the page-long work included in Black Letters Unleashed, is her only writing translated into English. It’s an extract from a collection of similar surrealist feuilletons published in 1978 in Manuskripte, an influential Austrian publication of the time. Mahendra says “the general tenor of the pieces reminds me of the Walser short ‘A Slap in the Face’… I’m looking over them and laughing, they’re pretty good. Burning chickens, leopards knocking at the door, time machines interacting with cats … they are right up your line.” You can now read “Body Demons” on 50 Watts, along with Mahendra’s own translation of another short work, “It Was a Beautiful Day.”

Mahendra writes:

Monica lived mostly in West Berlin, worked as a producer of documentaries for West German TV, and was a totally insane cat nut—Ming-Fatso & Ming-Scrawn is about her two Abyssinians. She wrote on the side, some good stuff but she was possessed of the true Bartleby spirit and simply couldn’t be bothered with the demon Ambition. She introduced me to Ernst, Walser, Gombrowicz, Saltykov, Lem and much more, the classic Central European tradition of mordant, black humour.  

Monica loved a crisp, cool Fontana Candida on a sweltering Virginia summer afternoon, followed by a good goulash and some Johann Stamitz on the stereo.

She was also involved sometimes with the Berlin Film Festival … she told me that when Kaurismäki attended one time, he had a guy who would walk before him with a bottle of schnapps on a silver tray, always ready to provide him a restorative shot.

She is sorely missed by her family (except for the damn cat hair that got into everything).

Also see: Two texts by Monica Tornow on 50 Watts.

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

50watts:

Learn about Monica Tornow (1938-2006) on Writers No One Reads and then read two of her fictions on 50 Watts.
German literature’s greatest unknown cat-lover … thank you, 50Watts!

50watts:

Learn about Monica Tornow (1938-2006) on Writers No One Reads and then read two of her fictions on 50 Watts.

German literature’s greatest unknown cat-lover … thank you, 50Watts!

The Illustrator’s Dictionary of Received OpinionsDeadline: a word uttered at such a high frequency that only illustrators, designers and pressmen can hear it, undetectable to writers and editors. Rush Job: similar to a blow job in that the illustrator is placed in a submissive, demeaning position with little hope of a meaningful relationship afterwards. Spec Job: similar to rush job with the added frisson of wearing rose-colored glasses while fellating the client.Art Director: twenty years ago, all ADs were frustrated illustrators, now they are frustrating illustrators. Unlike ordinary mortals, they grow younger each year.Advertising Agency Work: an illustrative auto-lobotomy.Spine: removal of which is the usual prerequisite to employment within any publication/advertising design staff.Nationally Recognized, Award-Winning Illustrator: their participation in any collaborative work usually works out to 99% of total fee, 1% of total labour. Accomplished boozers with excellent telephone manners.Agent: a tapeworm sanctified by capitalism, furnishes the basic template for 99% of the global economy.Advertising Account: invariably suspects that you will try to cheat them in the same manner that they have successfully cheated everyone else so far. A worthy symbiote to the advertising AD.A “Fresh”, “Hot” Illustration Style: a style of illustration which most closely resembles whatever style of clip-art was most popular when an AD was in art school.Fan Mail: the one perk of being an illustrator that no AD or editor will ever enjoy. The amount of fan mail one receives is inversely proportional to how “fresh” and “hot” ADs think your style is.Illustration Directory: wallpaper samples.Vector Art: a godsend for illustrators who cannot draw.Kill Fee: a sort of reward given in exchange for not doing one’s job, the apogee of postmodern, American capitalism.Licensing Fee: like a dog license except that dogs are more loyal than most licensed properties and their masters.Royalties: the penultimate stage before bankruptcy. They are called royalties because the current batch of royalty cheques wending their way through the post date from the reign of King George III.Graphic Novel: the last refuge of writers who draw even worse than they can write. Popular with the functionally illiterate, hence their general public appeal in North America.Editor: an alcoholic who can read and write while drunk.Publishing Company: a collection of alcoholics.Illustrator: an ink-stained whore.Hack: a successful ink-stained whore.Art School: a school for whores.Amazon: a pimp who offers delivery.

The Illustrator’s Dictionary of Received Opinions

Deadline: a word uttered at such a high frequency that only illustrators, designers and pressmen can hear it, undetectable to writers and editors.
Rush Job: similar to a blow job in that the illustrator is placed in a submissive, demeaning position with little hope of a meaningful relationship afterwards.
Spec Job: similar to rush job with the added frisson of wearing rose-colored glasses while fellating the client.
Art Director: twenty years ago, all ADs were frustrated illustrators, now they are frustrating illustrators. Unlike ordinary mortals, they grow younger each year.
Advertising Agency Work: an illustrative auto-lobotomy.
Spine: removal of which is the usual prerequisite to employment within any publication/advertising design staff.
Nationally Recognized, Award-Winning Illustrator: their participation in any collaborative work usually works out to 99% of total fee, 1% of total labour. Accomplished boozers with excellent telephone manners.
Agent: a tapeworm sanctified by capitalism, furnishes the basic template for 99% of the global economy.
Advertising Account: invariably suspects that you will try to cheat them in the same manner that they have successfully cheated everyone else so far. A worthy symbiote to the advertising AD.
A “Fresh”, “Hot” Illustration Style: a style of illustration which most closely resembles whatever style of clip-art was most popular when an AD was in art school.
Fan Mail: the one perk of being an illustrator that no AD or editor will ever enjoy. The amount of fan mail one receives is inversely proportional to how “fresh” and “hot” ADs think your style is.
Illustration Directory: wallpaper samples.
Vector Art: a godsend for illustrators who cannot draw.
Kill Fee: a sort of reward given in exchange for not doing one’s job, the apogee of postmodern, American capitalism.
Licensing Fee: like a dog license except that dogs are more loyal than most licensed properties and their masters.
Royalties: the penultimate stage before bankruptcy. They are called royalties because the current batch of royalty cheques wending their way through the post date from the reign of King George III.
Graphic Novel: the last refuge of writers who draw even worse than they can write. Popular with the functionally illiterate, hence their general public appeal in North America.
Editor: an alcoholic who can read and write while drunk.
Publishing Company: a collection of alcoholics.
Illustrator: an ink-stained whore.
Hack: a successful ink-stained whore.
Art School: a school for whores.
Amazon: a pimp who offers delivery.









writersnoonereads:

It’s unlikely that your somewhat erratic editors at Writers No One Reads will be able to provide a massive 2014 Book Preview in the near future, but in the meantime, possibly more to allay our own concerns in that regard than yours, we will, as should be expected, erratically share what we’re reading.
Originally published in 1969, Stanley Crawford’s Travel Notes has been out of print for decades until being rescued from oblivion by Calamari Press. Travel Notes is a strange novel capable of making any reader feel the surreality of being a tourist. It’s a work of baroque imagination, full of invention and absurdity: there is a linguist whose invented word has the capacity to destroy the world; a conspiracy of mail carriers in an abandoned city; a seaside resort where the beaches are lined with mausoleums; an oxymoronic line of hermit janitors… In the end, the book proves to be more than the sum of its parts, making it a welcome addition to Crawford’s sadly unread body of work. (SS)

Strongly recommended for readers who are fed up with the homogenized mewlings of the MFA-in-creative-writing drones that plague this land …

writersnoonereads:

It’s unlikely that your somewhat erratic editors at Writers No One Reads will be able to provide a massive 2014 Book Preview in the near future, but in the meantime, possibly more to allay our own concerns in that regard than yours, we will, as should be expected, erratically share what we’re reading.

Originally published in 1969, Stanley Crawford’s Travel Notes has been out of print for decades until being rescued from oblivion by Calamari Press. Travel Notes is a strange novel capable of making any reader feel the surreality of being a tourist. It’s a work of baroque imagination, full of invention and absurdity: there is a linguist whose invented word has the capacity to destroy the world; a conspiracy of mail carriers in an abandoned city; a seaside resort where the beaches are lined with mausoleums; an oxymoronic line of hermit janitors… In the end, the book proves to be more than the sum of its parts, making it a welcome addition to Crawford’s sadly unread body of work. (SS)

Strongly recommended for readers who are fed up with the homogenized mewlings of the MFA-in-creative-writing drones that plague this land …

I feel like cake today … so should you.

I feel like cake today … so should you.

melvillehouse:

everything-is-a-remix:

Karel Gott - Rot und Schwarz / Paint it Black (The Rolling Stones Cover)

Don’t know who Karel Gott is? BUCKLE UP. 

This is turning into a Gott fanblog from now until May when we publish Gottland. Believe it.

My mother is going to love this one … Melville House is a godsend for  book-loving Teutons and the sons who must shop for them.

iloveluciddreaming:

Follow I Love Lucid Dreaming if you’re a lucid dreamer :)
New to lucid dreaming? Start here

Dream lucid, live lucid …

iloveluciddreaming:

Follow I Love Lucid Dreaming if you’re a lucid dreamer :)

New to lucid dreaming? Start here

Dream lucid, live lucid …

A page from my in-progress Shakuntala … drawing the god that you’re named after easily trumps most authors’ stabs at world-building … not mention the vertiginous level of recursion that Borges could not even dream of.

A page from my in-progress Shakuntala … drawing the god that you’re named after easily trumps most authors’ stabs at world-building … not mention the vertiginous level of recursion that Borges could not even dream of.